Imaginative Play and Collaborative Art

I like to end the school year with something that gives kids a little freedom but also gives them enough structure that they are focused and busy during our last classes. Andy Goldworthy is the perfect inspiration for this type of project. He is a naturalist artist who uses only things he finds from nature in his sculptures and then after he is done, lets nature do what it will with the artwork. The kids find him fascinating. How does he do it? What is he using now? How is that balanced? How is that connected? Click here to watch some of the videos we watched in class so we could watch him work.

And some examples of his work:

Today was only Day 1 of our Goldworthy projects. We will continue this for the rest of this week and next week. Here are some pictures from today!

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I really just show them some of his work and tell them to go make art. They have so many stories to go with each sculpture! I believe the kids don’t ever get enough outside time or imaginative play time. This kills two birds with one stone, has them working together AND creating art. It can’t get much better!

Bruce Howdle

This project has become a favorite 3rd grade project for both myself as the teacher and my students. I love this project because I am able to hit on all of our ceramic standards easily, I am teaching about a local artist and the mugs always turn out amazing. The kids love it because it’s clay and they love animals!

Bruce Howdle

Bruce was a ceramics professor at the University of Madison Wisconsin from 1994 to 2005 and he is currently at the University of Platteville. Bruce has been a sculptor since 1976. He has a studio in Mineral Point and he is almost always around to talk about and sell his artwork. Howdle-Studios

 

 

 

 

mountain-climbersYou may recognize some of Bruce’s ceramic murals around town like this mural of mountain climbers. You can find it on the way west side off of Mineral Point on the TDS Metrocom building.

Univ Hospital Clinic

 

 

Or this mural at the University Hospital Clinic in Madison. Really, you can find his murals all over the country!

Randall Raccoons know Bruce’s work more for his animal work than his murals. Bruce is famous for his pigs. Each part is thrown on the wheel and then hand put together.

howdle pigBut the kids really love his animal mugs!

Ask your student how they came up with the idea for their own animal mug. What textures and colors did your child use? What details on their mug help you to know what animal it is? Why did they choose that animal?

Batik – in progress!

5th graders have just started a new project learning about the process of Batik. Batik uses hot wax as a resist on fabric to create a design. After the designs are created in wax, the fabric is dyed and left to dry. Once the fabric is dry, then the wax is ironed out of the fabric and you are left with a beautiful piece of work.

Right now, 5th graders are sketching mandala designs to transfer onto fabric where they have started the wax resist process.
 (Students faced blurred for privacy)

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Rosemaling and Balalaikas

Ms. B, our music teacher, told me third graders were learning about Russian Balalaikas in music class and many balalaikas have rosemaling on them. I didn’t know what a balalaika was but I knew lots about rosemaling! My grandma is a rosemaler and she taught me when I was little. Rosemaling was popular in Norway, Russia and many other eastern European countries. Ms. B concentrated on Russia in Music and we learned more about Norway in Art.

This is a balalaika:

B1Rosemaling is an art for the common person. It was popular when Rococo and Baroque art was popular. But Rococo and Baroque art is really just for the rich. Rosemalers taught each other in groups called guilds and they traveled around the country painting in people’s homes. They painted a lot of furniture. My grandma was taught by a Norwegian friend named Esther. She painted a lot of special places for weddings and babies. Here is a plate she painted for my other grandma and grandpa:

IMG_0009But she also painted plates just for arts’ sake as well:

IMG_0008Grandma first taught me when I was in third grade but the earliest example of my own rosemaling that I still have is from when I was in 5th grade:

IMG_0010Third graders started by looking through some of my grandma’s old rosemaling designs as well as her books.

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Third grade balalaikas turned out beautifully!

IMG_0004 IMG_0005 IMG_0006 IMG_0003Check out some of the third graders performance of their Balalaika song here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ni76Jmt7yNY

MMSD Art Standards:

Standards One A: Visual Memory and Knowledge – Students will know and remember information and ideas about the art and design around them and throughout the world. Students will identify the subject matter or story communicated through art.

Standard One B: Art and Design History, Citizenship and Environment – Students will understand and value significance of the visual arts, media and design in relation to history, citizenship, the environment and social development.

Standard Three: Students will design artwork organized by compositional principals, expressive features and sensory qualities. Students will identify and use color, shape, line, texture and space in works of art. Students will identify repetition.

Standard Four: Creates – Students will create images and objects that communicate and express ideas using varied media, techniques and processes. Students will recognize and use previously introduced elements, media, techniques and processes and will continue to expand their knowledge which includes drawing as a tool for planning and techniques and processes of color mixing which include secondary colors.

Standard Six: Reflecting – Students reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of own work and the work of others. Students will participate in group discussions describing the artwork.

Standard Seven: Interpreting – Students will interpret the visual experience with a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas. Students will identify the narrative qualities of artwork such as cultural meanings and illustrations. Students will create artwork with various subject matter, symbols and emotional content.

Standard Eight: Understanding – Students understand the function and structure of the visual arts in relation to human history and cultures. Students will view styles and techniques of a limited number of artists and/or cultures past and present.

Standard Nine: Making Connections – Students will make connections among the visual arts with other disciplines. Students will start recognizing the principles of art in various art disciplines and recognize the endless relationships between visual arts and other disciplines.

MMSD Music Standards:

Standard Eight: Relating – Students relate music to all other arts and disciplines. Students will identify similarities in the meanings of common terms such as form, patter and contrast used in music and visual arts.

WAEA Youth Art Month Southwest Art Show

It’s that time of year again.

The Wisconsin Art Education Association Youth Art Month Southwest Art Show is up!!

Place: UW-Baraboo/Sauk County, 1006 Connie Road, Baraboo (Campus Building – Aural M. Umhoefer Classroom & Administration)

Hours: Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Show Dates: February 17 – 22, 2014

Closing Reception: Informal, Saturday, February 22, anytime from 12:00 – 2:00 p.m.

This year Madison has THREE schools participating: Blackhawk Middle School, Crestwood Elementary and Randall Elementary.
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Congrats to our ten Randall participants!

Eleanor, Daquan, Thomas, Emilie, Griffin, Daniel, Quinn, Jett, Mirra and Jou

Results-

  • 1st Place Daniel  (Daniel’s work will be at the Capitol show in March!)

  • 2nd Place Griffin

  • 3rd Place Daquan

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Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein is an American pop artist. Pop is short for popular. Pop Art uses images, ideas and people from popular culture. Comic books are from popular culture and Roy Lichtenstein often used the format of comic book art in his work. He used speech bubbles and onomatopoeias as well as primary and neutral colors.  Often his work featured some sort of drama as well.

Whaam! 1963 by Roy Lichtenstein 1923-1997Randall 5th graders chose an image from popular culture to create a comic book style drawing of their own. Craftsmanship was discussed often in this project. Students were careful to fill the entire space, use contrasting patterns and color neatly using solid lines.

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MMSD Art Standards:

Standard 1: Visual Memory and Knowledge

Students will know and remember information and ideas about art and design around them and throughout the world. 5th graders will identify the purposes, subject matter, stories, feelings or symbols communicated through art.

Standard 3: Designs

Students will design artwork organized by compositional principles. expressive features and sensory qualities. 5th graders will identify and use color, shape, line, texture, space and movement in works of art. 5th graders will identify and use contrast, repetition, emphasis, unity and variety.

Standard 4: Creates

Students will create images and object that communicate and express ideas using varied media, techniques and processes. 5th graders will recognize and use previously introduced elements, media, techniques, and processes and will continue to expand their knowledge which includes: Drawing as a planning tool to interpret and express personal thoughts, Drawing with contour line, textural elements, and value and figure drawing.

Standard 7: Interpreting

Students will interpret the visual experience with a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas. 5th graders will identify subject matter and feeling found in art, identify the narrative qualities of artwork and identify the purpose of various artworks. 5th graders will define, discover and understand symbols and emotional content used in specific artwork.

Standard 9: Making Connections

Students will make connections among the visual arts with other disciplines. 5th graders will recognize endless relationships between the visual arts and other arts and socials studies.