5th gr Color Wheels

 

MMSD Art Standards:

Designs: Identify and use color, shapes, line, texture, and space in works of art. Identify and use contrast, repetition, emphasis, unity, and variety

Creates: Recognize and use previously introduced elements, media, techniques, and processes and will continue to expand their knowledge which includes: The techniques and processes of color mixing which include secondary colors, tints and shades as well as complimentary colors.

Produces: Be aware of the proper use of various kinds of brushes.

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4th gr Color Wheels

 

MMSD Art Standards:

Designs: Identify and use color, shapes, line, texture, and space in works of art. Identify and use contrast, repetition, emphasis (center of interest).

Creates: Recognize and use previously introduced elements, media, techniques, and processes and will continue to expand their knowledge which includes: The techniques and processes of color mixing which include secondary colors and color families.

Produces: Be aware of the proper use of various kinds of brushes.

Jacob Lawrence

Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000) is a painter who is well known for documenting the great migration of free slaves from the south to the north. Lawrence lived in the New York neighborhood of Harlem in the 1920s. Lawrence was inspired by African American sculpture August Savage. He thought about the Great Migration in the 30s and decided to honor and record this event through his art. He spent months in the library researching historical events before he started his series on migration.

This panel is panel 57 of a woman doing laundry. She seems to be concentrating on her work with determination. We discussed this painting in depth. What do you know about the woman in this painting? What shapes do you see? What do the shapes represent?

Picturing America is a collection of posters given to schools around the country by a grant from the National Endowment for Humanities. This painting is part of that series. Picturing America posters come with a video, questions, information and lesson ideas for each image. Before starting our own paintings, we watched Picturing America’s video on Jacob Lawrence.

Then we discussed our own migration stories. Some students are first generation migrants while others’ families came to the US many generations ago. Each story is important to the make up of our community and each story deserves to be documented and told. So each student took their migration story and painted their own three panel of paintings just like Jacob Lawrence.

This is painting is by a student who just moved here from Russia this year.

Telling the Hmong migration story.

Irish migration.

African slave trade.

Some students either didn’t want to tell or didn’t know how to tell their migration stories so they painted a series on an important event in their life.

Wisconsin protests February 2011.

Music.

Students have relieved so many compliments on their beautiful paintings!

Circle Painting

This circle painting stuff has been flying around the art education blogs recently. Check out a few blog posts at My Blog of Art and Elementary Art Fun. A video on circle painting here and a whole website with lots of examples here. I wasn’t going to jump on the circle painting bandwagon but when Randall PTO asked me to create something to auction off to raise money for Neighborhood House, I thought we’d do some collaborative art.

The circle painting was just meant to be an exercise to introduce 3rd graders to the idea of collaborative art work. Their conversations while working and their actual painting fascinated me! They were wonderful at discussing whole ideas, how they decided to work together (take turns or work at once?), sharing space, talking out disagreements and so much more. Their work turned out beautiful and so unique from group to group!

Students began with a simple shape in the middle. Each student had one color to paint with and every five minutes or so they would switch colors. Some groups decided that one at a time would paint. Others decided that they would work all at the same time. Each way presented it’s own problems. The group that decided they would work one at a time found out that their mural wasn’t as filled as the other groups. The group that decided to work all at the same time discovered another problem of respecting others’ space and work.

Each kept growing and growing for the entire art period. None of the students became bored and they were all engaged. There wasn’t one student that wasn’t excited to participate or frustrated at other group members.

You can see how each group’s working philosophies played out in their paintings.

Here are the final results!!

Gorgeous.

Monochromatic Self Portraits

Lesson inspired by smART Class.

First art project of the school year! Today after school I hung five art classes worth of art work. Up and down the huge ladder that I haul from hallway to hallway. I have ten art classes art work to hang still. It may be a lot of work to hang artwork but it is very worth it. I think it’s very important for artists to see their work displayed. As I was hanging art, a 3rd grader had come back to school with her mom to get something she forgot in her classroom. The mom started asking her daughter questions about her work in the hallway. They had a lovely conversation about her art. This is part of what art is, getting people to talk and question new ideas.

Students started with a pencil drawing about themselves. Some students chose to draw themselves and some chose to draw objects that describe them.

After students finished their pencil drawings, students picked one color plus black and white to paint their paintings.

We learned some new art vocabulary. Monochromatic means something that is one color with tints and shades of that color. Tints would be white with color added and shades are the color with black added.

Students also learned about craftsmanship with a little help from Tricia Fuglestad’s White Spot Inspector and Black Marker.

Stay tuned for the second projects of the school year! 3rd graders are starting to learn about Madison artist Bruce Howdle with a clay project, 4th graders are starting to learn about Wisconsin Georgia O’Keefe with watercolors and 5th graders are starting to learn about American Pop artist Andy Warhol and printmaking.

2/3 Degas Sculpture

We began by doing gesture drawings of each other so we took those drawings as inspiration for poses for our sculptures.  We created our people out of aluminum foil and tape.  We then covered them in plaster strips and painted them to look like bronze sculptures.  We were inspired by Dega’s sculpture:

We began with our aluminum foil,

and twisted it into a human form.

Using our gesture drawings and our freeze dance party as inspiration for poses, we can up with many different ideas.

Next class, we added the plaster.  New materials are always the most fun!  Students were so quiet and focused during this part.  They were really, really into it. This is going to have to be one of those lessons that I keep repeating every year.

And then paint:

Can you guess what the artists posed their sculptures doing?

K/1 Leaf Prints

Kindergartners and first graders reviewed warm colors while adding some new words to their art vocabulary. We learned ‘Visual Texture from Mrs. Fuglestad’s Dryden students in this video as well as how to draw trees with branches using the letter ‘V’.

First we went outside to choose our perfect leaf for printing.  Then we came back inside to learn the difference between real texture (the bumps on our leaves) and visual texture (drawing our trees to look like the bark is bumpy).  Then we drew ourselves playing around the trees and printed our leaves in our tree branches.