3rd grade Labor Murals

3rd graders began this lesson with a close reading of Diego Rivera’s murals. Students got into groups and began sketching their plan for their own group mural. As they began painting, they needed to review how to mix for secondary colors. They also needed to know what kinds of brushes to use. It makes sense to say out loud that you would need a small brush for details and a large brush for the big areas, but it is something students needed to be reminded of to think about.

Students really started to learn what the word craftsmanship means through this project. At various stages, students needed to be on the lookout for different ways they could see in their murals that they were really doing their best work and not rushing things. In the painting stage, that meant being White Spot Inspectors. When they were finished painting, that meant getting out their black markers. If you click on the links, you can see the videos created by another art teacher that students watched on these craftsmanship concepts.

IMG_3849 IMG_3854 IMG_3853After painting the murals, students learned about gesture drawings to help them create the workers for their murals.

gesture

After a month and a half of work, here are the results!

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Standards in this lesson-

MMSD Art Standards

Identify the subject matter or story communicated through art.

Identify and use color, shapes, line, texture, and space in works of art.

Recognize and use previously introduced elements, media, techniques, and processes and will continue to expand their knowledge which includes:

1. Drawing as a planning tool for later use with a variety of media.
2. Drawing with contour line.
3. The techniques and processes of color mixing which include secondary colors
Describe artwork and will continue to develop this skill.
Participate in group discussions describing artwork.
Identify subject matter and feeling found in art. Identify the narrative qualities of artwork, i.e. cultural meaning and illustrations.
Create artwork with various subject matter, symbols, and emotional content.
View styles and techniques of a limited number of artists, and/or cultures past and present.
Start recognizing the principles of art in various art disciplines
Recognize endless relationships between visual arts and other
disciplines, i.e. Observation drawing – social studies, science Landscape painting – science, social studies
MMSD Social Emotional Standards
Students will work cooperatively with partner and in small groups.
Students will identify and practice strategies for resolving conflicts constructively.
Students will recognize that they have choices in how to respond to situations.

Diego Rivera and Close Reading

Close reading is the new buzz word in our classrooms. It is traditionally associated with literacy, the close reading of text. But text can be many different things, not just a traditional book or article. Text can also be a painting, sculpture, piece of music or graphic. Close reading might be the new buzz word in our elementary classrooms but it is something we art and music teachers have been doing for decades.

Essentially, close reading means reading to uncover layers of meaning that lead to deep comprehension. A good example of close reading in the art room is the lesson third graders just finished. They began this lesson with a close reading of the text of Diego Rivera’s labor murals in Detroit.

In close reading, there is a focus on observing and analyzing. The same questions that classroom teachers use to probe for deeper understanding in reading are the same questions we art teachers use as well. Remember, the text is the murals.

  • Who is speaking in the text?
  • Who seems to be the main audience? (To whom is the artist speaking?)
  • What is the first thing that jumps out at me? Why?
  • What’s the next thing I notice? Are these two things connected? How? Do they seem to be saying different things?
  • What seems important here? Why?
  • What does the artist mean by ______? What parts of the mural lead me to this meaning?
  • Is the artist trying to convince me of something? What? How do I know?
  • Is there something missing from this mural that I expected to find? Why might the artist have left this out?
  • Is there anything that could have been explained more thoroughly for greater clarity?
  • Is there a message or main idea? What in the text led me to this conclusion?
  • How does this painting fit into the murals as a whole?
  • What symbols are present? Why did the artist choose these symbols?
  • What images(s) stand out? Why? (typically vivid images, unusual choices, or a contrast to what a reader expects)
  • How do particular images get us to look at characters or events in a particular way? Do they evoke an emotion?
  • Are there any images that could have more than one meaning? Why might the artist have played with images in this way?
  • What one word describes the tone?
  • Does an image here remind you of an image elsewhere in the mural? Where? What’s the connection?
  • How might this image fit into the pattern of the mural as a whole?
  • Is there any repetition within the mural? What is the effect of that repetition?

The questioning could go on forever. Once the students get started in this line of questioning, they get really excited about it. I’m also very excited because students start to see the artwork in a whole new way!

After an in depth discussion prompted by the close reading of the text, students brainstormed what labor they see in their own communities.

From here, students got into groups depending on which labor group they wanted to focus on and started brainstorming the people in those groups. Who collects our garbage? Who grows our food? Who delivers our mail? Who fixes our pipes? Who builds the buildings? etc.

The next class, students started sketches of murals they would then create in groups inspired by labor in their own communities and Deigo Rivera’s murals.

Standards in this lesson:

Common Core Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.7 Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting)

MMSD Social Studies Standards

Examine Madison’s history (i.e.energy, transportation, communication, art, architecture).
Recognize and interpret how the “common good” can be strengthened through various forms of citizen action.\

Describe the ways people participate in the community in order to provide goods and services whether through paid or volunteer activities.
Explain why people specialize in different occupations and describe how that specialization leads to increasing interdependence between producers and consumers in a community.
Recognize systems that are developed to meet specific community needs: government, transportation, education, communications.
Define a community as an interdependent group of people living and working together.
Demonstrates an ability to interact within a group while performing various group roles (i.e. organizing, planning, and goal setting).
Apply and practice skills of conflict resolution (persuasion, compromise, debate, and negotiation).

MMSD Art Standards

Identify the subject matter or story communicated through art.

Identify and use color, shapes, line, texture, and space in works of art.

Recognize and use previously introduced elements, media, techniques, and processes and will continue to expand their knowledge which includes:

1. Drawing as a planning tool for later use with a variety of media.
2. Drawing with contour line.
3. The techniques and processes of color mixing which include secondary colors
Describe artwork and will continue to develop this skill.
Participate in group discussions describing artwork.
Identify subject matter and feeling found in art. Identify the narrative qualities of artwork, i.e. cultural meaning and illustrations.
Create artwork with various subject matter, symbols, and emotional content.
View styles and techniques of a limited number of artists, and/or cultures past and present.
Start recognizing the principles of art in various art disciplines
Recognize endless relationships between visual arts and other
disciplines, i.e. Observation drawing – social studies, science Landscape painting – science, social studies
MMSD Social Emotional Standards
Students will work cooperatively with partner and in small groups.
Students will identify and practice strategies for resolving conflicts constructively.
Students will recognize that they have choices in how to respond to situations.

Unity Days – Collaborative Circle Weavings

Unity Days have quickly become a loved Randall tradition! We have two Unity Days in fall and two in the spring. Unity Days have a dual purpose. One, to get assessments done by pulling students out to complete them throughout the day and two to mix everyone up by grade level and experience lots of different community building activities throughout the day.

This year’s Unity Day in the art room, students were all involved in collaborative circle weavings. Creating art work in circle patterns or mandala designs have long been known in many cultures and religions to bring restorative benefits and meditative qualities to the artist and the observer.

Part of an art show for the Race to Equity Summit through the YMCA, this piece is currently hanging at the NEW Central Madison Library in the beautiful children’s room!

IMG_3061 IMG_3065 IMG_3067

 

MMSD Art Standards:

Designs: Describes how different expressive features and principles cause different responses.

Reflecting: Understand that there are various purposes for creating works of visual art.

Interpreting: Understand that different subject matter and ideas communicate meaning.

Understanding: Know that the visual arts have both a history and specific relationship to various cultures.

 

MMSD Social Emotional Standards:

Emotional Development and Personal Emotions: Students will demonstrate a variety of strategies to calm themselves. Students will practice calming strategies and describe their effect on emotions

Emotional Development and Social Skills:  Students will use language to interact with others and communicate effectively in activities and discussions. Students will describe how words, tone and body language are used to communicate with others positively and negatively. Students will work cooperatively with partner and in small groups. Students will identify and practice strategies for resolving conflicts constructively. Student will work cooperatively and productively in a group to accomplish a set goal.

 

 

Randall Neighborhood Walk

Terrace Town is fast approaching. We have three Randall classes that are participating this year! My role is a little different this time around. Last time I did Terrace Town with three fifth grade classes with no collaboration from classroom teachers. This year, the three classroom teachers are in charge of everything but construction and even that’s a collaborative effort! It’s so much more fun when we all work together.. : )

My role in Terrace Town kicked off last week with a walking tour of our neighborhood with our students, teachers and wonderful parent volunteers.

Here’s a photo diary of our journey-

Bike trails. See the Capitol hiding back there?Mixed use buildings with small, local businesses.

Mini-library.

Another mixed use building, Trader Joe’s.

Finding answers on our worksheets..

Talking about the Indian Mounds in the green space.

Accessibility issues.

Co-housing.

Walking back.. : )

 

Preview: 5th grade Paper Mache

5th graders worked in partners to paper mache a balloon.  This proved to be tricky as sometimes the balloon ran away from them!  But they are smart and worked to put paper mache in key places to balance the balloon.  They created layers for 45 minutes so next week, we can cut them in half and they will be strong enough to use as a base for our masks.

 

Check back to find out what these messy, paper mache balloons will turn into!